Luber global environmental health agenda of the federal

Luber et al. (2014) noted that the increasing
level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is contributing to high plants
growths in different parts of the country, especially species that release
aeroallergens. When the airborne allergens infiltrate homes, they reduce indoor
air quality and make residents susceptible to a variety of diseases.

These
outcomes of climate changes in the United States highlight the need for
modification of energy consumption patterns that would have tremendous impacts
on the amount of pollutants such as sulfates and black carbon emitted into the
atmosphere. Therefore, the global environmental health agenda of the federal
government should focus on the effect of climate-related changes on the health
of the citizen

Fann et al. (2015) described the above
conceptual diagram as an illustration of the key pathways that exposes human to
the threats from climate drivers, as well as their role in the development of
health problems. An analysis of the diagram would reveal the vulnerability
influence of this changes on the people and community.

While
the rate of emission of air pollutants through regulatory modifications is
reduced in the United States, alterations in the climatic conditions and the
occurrence of natural disasters would continue to erode whatever progress the
country has made regarding its environment.

Chang,
Hao,
& Sarnat (2014) described ground-level ozone as a
“key
component of smog, is formed by chemical interactions between sunlight and
pollutants including nitrogen oxides (NOx) and
volatile organic compounds (VOCs).” Sources of this pollutant include
emissions from motor vehicle, electric power generation plant, and natural
elements.

Fann et al. (2015) reports a range
of mortality outcomes based on different methods of computing the
mortality effects of ozone changes.

These
outcomes of climate changes in the United States highlight the need for
modification of energy consumption patterns that would have tremendous impacts
on the amount of pollutants such as sulfates and black carbon emitted into the
atmosphere.

It is pertinent to note that the
situation regarding the role of aeroallergens in the development of asthma and alllergies is combined with other factors.
Also, the outcome of the assessment of environmental experts is that the
population of the plants that produce aeroallergens would reduce and
temperature become warmer thereby resulting shorter pollen seasons.

Luber et al. (2014) noted that the current
level of health disparity regarding access, cost and quality of services
experienced by the at-risk population in the country would be exacerbated by
the health problems caused by increased concentration of ground level ozone,
longer pollen season and high levels of particulate matter in the atmosphere.