Matthew since the beginning of the flow of

Matthew RowlandMs. DeSantisEnglish 2H19 January 2017Refugee Crisis in TurkeyIhlamur-Öner, Suna G. “Turkey’s Refugee Regime Stretched to the Limit? the Case of Iraqi and Syrian Refugee Flows.” Perceptions, vol. 18, no. 3, 2013, pp. 191-228, Research Library Prep, https://search.proquest.com/docview/1504460580?accountid=46586.Suna Gülfer Ihlamur-Öner, in their journal “Turkey’s Refugee Regime Stretched to the Limit? The Case of Iraqi and Syrian Refugee Flows” (2013) explains that Turkey has been a safe haven for refugees due to its geographical location and its common social, cultural and historical ties with the Balkans, the Caucasus, Europe and the Middle East. They support their claim by providing factual information on how the recent increase in the number of refugees and travel to Turkey, particularly from Middle Eastern countries like Syria but also from Asian and African countries, has grown. Ihlamur-Öner’s purpose is to raise awareness about the refugee crisis in Turkey in order to prove that the need for a substantial change and update in the Turkish refugee regime is long overdue. Ihlamur-Öner is writing to inform the general public of the significance of the refugee flows into Turkey and how the Turkish government has responded.”Up to the present day, Turkey has preferred to deal with refugee influxes with pieces of legislation, rather than a single fully-fledged law.” (Ihlamur-Öner)”At the beginning of the crisis, the Syrian security forces tried to prevent the arrival of refugees into Turkey and, since the beginning of the flow of the refugees towards Turkey, the Syrian regime accuses Turkey of providing refuge and giving logistical support to the Syrian ‘terrorists’ in its territory.” (Ihlamur-Öner)”The influx of the Iraqi Kurds and the Syrian refugees posed intricate challenges for the Turkish policymakers, the most important being striking a balance between security concerns and allowing the refugees to seek refuge in Turkish territory.” (Ihlamur-Öner)”At the beginning of the crisis, the Syrian security forces tried to prevent the arrival of refugees into Turkey and, since the beginning of the flow of the refugees towards Turkey, the Syrian regime accuses Turkey of providing refuge and giving logistical support to the Syrian ‘terrorists’ in its territory.” (Ihlamur-Öner)Karakoç, Jülide, and Fulya Dogruel. “THE IMPACT OF TURKEY’S POLICY TOWARD SYRIA ON HUMAN SECURITY.” Arab Studies Quarterly, vol. 37, no. 4, 2015, pp. 351-366, eLibrary; Research Library Prep, https://search.proquest.com/docview/1759323809?accountid=46586. Jülide Karakoç and Fulya Dogruel, in their journal “THE IMPACT OF TURKEY’S POLICY TOWARD SYRIA ON HUMAN SECURITY” (2015) argue that many of Turkey’s new and changing policies toward Syria due to the Syrian uprisings that began in March 2011 have caused major implications for the people that live in the city of Hatay, located on the Turkey-Syria border with a diverse people, both ethnically and religiously. They support their claim by explaining that certain actions of both Syrian refugees and Turkish citizens have caused distrust in the government and have provided specific examples of said actions. Karakoç and Dogruel’s purpose is to explore how the difficult connections between Turkey and Syria have changed the way people look at human security in order to prove that Turkey’s policies toward Syria and the consequences of these policies on the people of Hatay have fueled new and incorrect perceptions of insecurity for refugees coming from Syria and for residents of Hatay.”Turkey’s change in policy toward Syria following the start of Syrian uprisings in March 2011 has led to a dramatic transformation of the bilateral relations of the two countries, with all diplomatic and economic relations being put on hold.” (Karakoç and Dogruel)”Following the start of the war in Syria, Turkey displayed an anti-Assad government position not only through its active support of the Syrian rebels but also by accepting thousands of refugees fleeing the war in Syria.” (Karakoç and Dogruel)”Points of views that generalize people-especially the Alawite community-based on concerns and fear of the prospect of war between Turkey and Syria as Baathists, and all refugees as warriors, are damaging both groups, leading to confrontations.” (Karakoç and Dogruel)”According to the refugee rights Agreement, these camps are to be established away from the war zone and the conflict environment. The camps here, however, are right next to the border.” (Karakoç and Dogruel)Karaman, Mehmet A., and Richard J. Ricard. “Meeting the Mental Health Needs of Syrian Refugees in Turkey.” The Professional Counselor, vol. 6, no. 4, 2016, pp. 318-327, Research Library Prep, https://search.proquest.com/docview/185381846 6?accountid=46586, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.15241/mk.6.4.318. Mehmet A Karaman, in their journal “Meeting the Mental Health Needs of Syrian Refugees in Turkey” (2016) explains that conflicts in Syria have forced much of the Syrian population to flee from their homes and toward safe havens, or other countries or regions. They support their claim by stating that refugees from Syria are the second largest group of refugees in the world, with a bit over half of them having moved and settled in to Turkey. Karaman’s purpose is to argue that, albeit the efforts to aid with the mental and social needs of the Syrian refugees that have been forced to migrate, services such as counseling and guidance are still lacking in order to address the mental and physical health needs of Syrian refugees and provide helpful information to counselors that use different approaches to look into multiple perspectives of the mental health of refugees and their well-being.”Syrian refugees are enduring daily challenges to physical and mental survival. In addition to the extreme needs for physical and nutritional interventions, mental health professionals recognize the urgent need for counseling services based on widespread documented reports of refugees’ exile experiences and exposure to multiple sources of trauma.” (Karaman)”Counseling services are usually not the immediate priority of refugees; most refugees will not seek available counseling or even be able to take part in counseling activities if they do not have a roof over their heads or food in their stomachs and are struggling to survive.” (Karaman)”Syrian refugees are in need of basic services such as shelter, nutrition, education, medication and health care services. Approximately 1.4 million Syrian refugees are children, and the United Nations Children’s Fund has reported that these children are at risk of being a ‘lost generation.'” (Karaman)”Empirically validated research on the mental health needs of the Syrian refugees in Turkey and other countries (e.g., Lebanon) is limited due to a lack of focus on the assessment procedures and diagnostic reporting.” (Karaman)