Separation president constantly competing for control of the

Separation of powers was an idea, initially created as a way  to divide the  power within the government among the executive, legislative, and judicial branches as separate sections of the  national government. This in turn produced several different institutions within these branches  the Congress, the executive branch, and the judicial branch with the ability to influence the nation’s agenda and affect  its decisions. The president’s role or what he was given the sole power to do in the  government was established  after 1937.  This was meant to be a good decision, though soon lead to  both Congress and the president constantly competing for control of the national government and its decisions. NO branch truly wanted to share the power. This was extremely prominent in times of divided government. For example, when one party has the most members in parts of congress. At one point Teddy Roosevelt was a republican president with a congress that was also filled of republicans. This leading to his decisions being quickly and easily passed because no one disagreed with his ideas, even if they were proven to be idiotic. The advancement of the separation made it easier for more parties to be voted into the H.O.R or congress, so that more view points on a topic would be offered, essentially stopping bad decisions or laws proposed by any branch from being made. Based upon  the conduct of the government in recent years, the branches appear to be straying from the originally designed plans. It used to be that the president would execute the laws passed by Congress, and the Supreme court would then interpret them for or in individual cases. This was the political plan set in place by the Constitution and adherently followed  for most parts in our political history. As times continue to change,  however, it is seen to be that this is no longer how the federal government chooses to operate. The craving for a change with the constitutional decision increasingly grows. FOr most parts of American history the separation of powers was helpful in stopping the government corruption, but now that government corruption, faulty votes, and specifically chose delegates escalates. The destruction of this separation becomes more of a possibility.