Tropical Ellen Hofsvang (Rainforest foundation Norway and GRID-Arendal,

Tropical deforestation means clearing, cutting and removal
of the earth’s forests on a massive scale and converts it for non-forest use,
which damagesquality of the land. According to WWF 31% land area is covered by
forest.In fact, Canada, China, Russia, Brazil, Indonesia, The United States and
the Democratic Republic of Congo are the seven nations that from more than 60%
of the total forest area on earth.

Figure 1: Deforested areas of the world.

Nevertheless, much of the developing
world shows rapid and continued rates of deforestation. In 16 tropical
countries, net forest loss was estimated to have exceeded two percent annually
for the years 1980-1985; while the percentage rate of loss tended to be
relatively low for countries with large forests, the absolute amounts of deforestation
suffered by Brazil and Indonesia.1Tropical
rainforests are the main victim of deforestation. As rainforests are destroyed,
the values and services they provideare threatened. The sustainability of
nearly two-thirds of our planet’s supply of ecosystem services may be in
jeopardy.2Long
term development goals obsolete because of ecological degradation of the world.
It is estimated that rainforests contain 42% of all carbon stored in forests.3
The carbon content of rainforests is thus significantly higher than for other
forest types. The Amazon forest contains 176 billion tons of carbon (27% of all
carbon in forests), more than the rainforests of the Congo Basin and Southeast
Asia put together.4
Deforestation in developing country is extensive rather than developed country.
Already industrialized countries ‘needs’ and developing countries ‘needs’ are
different in many ways. Poor countries are going for further development that’s
why they needs economic growth. Deforestation is the culmination of various
activities which are generated by state and non-state actors. There are so many
direct, indirect causes of deforestation which greatly affects our climate and
causes climate change.

1
Robert Waker, Deforestation and Economic
Growth(Canada: Regional and urban studies centre,1993),P-489

2The
state of the rain forest.

3FAO 2011

4The State of The Rain Forest 2014,
edited by Ellen Hofsvang (Rainforest
foundation Norway and GRID-Arendal, September 2014),p-6